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April 1946

SIGNIFICANCE OF CORNEAL AND PHARYNGEAL REFLEXES IN NEUROLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY

Author Affiliations

Assistant Surgeon (R), United States Public Health Service; NEW YORK

From the Medical Center for Federal Prisoners, Springfield, Mo., and St. Elizabeths Hospital, Washington, D. C.

Arch NeurPsych. 1946;55(4):320-337. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300150024002
Abstract

DURING the course of the neurologic examination, deviations from classic normality occur even in the absence of organic disease of the nervous system. Much experience and intuition are required to distinguish normal variations from pathologic signs, and too frequently the presence of asymmetry is allowed to constitute the determining factor. It would seem only reasonable to assume that some of the determinants of these deviant, but nonpathologic, signs might have significance for the clinician. For example, variations in reflex responses might be found to occur in definite patterns, so that a single observation could be interpreted in terms of its conformity to the pattern set by the other reflexes rather than in terms of an absolute standard. Another possibility is that psychic attitude might be expressed by, or might determine, patterns of reflex variability. Accordingly, complete neurologic examinations were performed and the results recorded in conjunction with diagnostic psychiatric interviews

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