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June 1946

SIMILARITY OF CEREBRAL ARTERIOVENOUS OXYGEN DIFFERENCES ON RIGHT AND LEFT SIDES IN RESTING MAN

Author Affiliations

ALBANY, N. Y.

From the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Albany Medical College.

Arch NeurPsych. 1946;55(6):578-582. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300170022003
Abstract

THE cerebral arteriovenous oxygen differences have frequently been determined in man without taking into consideration whether the venous blood was drawn from the right or the left internal jugular vein. Nevertheless, textbooks of anatomy state that the two internal jugular veins do not necessarily drain symmetric portions of the brain. This difference in drainage has been emphasized by Gibbs and Gibbs1 and, more recently, by Batson.2 Only rarely is there a torcular Herophili, a single chamber, in which the venous blood from the cerebral hemispheres and from the basal ganglia mix. Usually the superior longitudinal sinus directs most of its blood to one or the other of the lateral sinuses, while the straight sinus sends its blood to the opposite side. Riggs, cited by Kety and Schmidt,3 examined 25 autopsy specimens and observed that most of the blood from the superior longitudinal sinus went to the right

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