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September 1946

EFFECTS OF DENERVATION ON FASCICULATIONS IN HUMAN MUSCLE: Relation of Fibrillations to Fasciculations

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Neurology of Jefferson Medical College.

Arch NeurPsych. 1946;56(3):276-283. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1946.02300200033002
Abstract

IN A previous communication1 evidence was presented to the effect that fasciculations in voluntary muscle have their site of origin not in the anterior horn cell but at the myoneural junction. This evidence consisted of the demonstration of continued fasciculations during pharmacologic block of the appropriate peripheral nerves or nerve roots and of the alteration of the frequency of fasciculations by drugs acting at the myoneural junction.

Subsequently, Denny-Brown2 mentioned the disadvantages of pharmacologic block and indicated that this type of block could not be considered absolute in the physiologic sense, for the drug employed need not affect all the fibers in a given nerve to the same degree nor could the interference with transmission of sensory or voluntary motor stimuli permit one to conclude that all impulses were blocked.

For these reasons, confirmatory evidence for our previous premise regarding the site of origin of fasciculations was sought.

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