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September 1947

EFFECT OF QUINACRINE (ATABRINE) ON THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM: Clinical and Electroencephalographic Studies

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.; CINCINNATI

From the Departments of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Arch NeurPsych. 1947;58(3):337-350. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1947.02300320088005
Abstract

THE INTRODUCTION of quinacrine hydrochloride (atabrine dihydrochloride) as an antimalarial agent has brought with it the usual problem of untoward reactions with which physicians must become familiar. Important among the toxic effects encountered have been psychotic reactions. The appearance of such reactions during the widespread use of this drug in the armed forces, as well as indications that some of the related antimalarial compounds being studied might also have an effect on the central nervous system, led to a request by the Board for the Coordination of Malarial Studies that we investigate this action of the drug in human subjects. The results of this study were transmitted to the Board in the summer of 1944.

Gaskill and Fitz-Hugh1 recently reported on the incidence of such "toxic psychoses" among patients with malaria who had been treated with quinacrine. In seven months' experience in an army hospital in a highly endemic

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