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January 1950

ELECTRIC SHOCK THERAPY OF ACUTE PSYCHOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: Report of a Case

Author Affiliations

MEMPHIS, TENN.

From the Medical and Neuropsychiatric Services, Veterans Administration Medical Teaching Group, Kennedy Hospital:

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;63(1):110-112. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310190116009
Abstract

THE OCCURRENCE of mental symptoms associated with pernicious anemia has been noted ever since the original description of the disease by Addison in 1848.1 Minor mental manifestations are fairly frequent. Goldhamer and co-workers,2 in an extensive study of the neurologic changes in pernicious anemia, noted irritability in 64 per cent, memory disturbances in 60 per cent and mild depression in 58 per cent of cases. More serious manifestations were less frequent. Delusions occurred in 18 per cent, coma in 18 per cent, hallucinations in 16 per cent, apathy in 6 per cent and maniacal outbursts in 2 per cent of cases. Mental aberration severe enough to be classed as psychosis was found in 15.7 per cent of patients with pernicious anemia by Herman and his co-workers.3 They also reported that 0.08 per cent of nonalcoholic patients admitted to the psychiatric division of Bellevue Hospital had pernicious anemia.

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