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March 1950

CENTRAL PROTRUSION OF CERVICAL INTERVERTEBRAL DISK INVOLVING DESCENDING TRIGEMINAL TRACT: Report of a Case

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;63(3):455-466. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310210101009
Abstract

LATERAL protrusion of a lower cervical intervertebral disk has been thoroughly investigated by recent workers, and its pressure effect on the nerve root has become a distinct clinical syndrome. However, protrusion occurring in the midline, compressing chiefly the spinal cord, has often been mistaken for neoplasm, as is well illustrated by the early writings of Stookey1 and Dandy.2 It is the purpose of this paper not only to point out once more that central protrusion of a cervical intervertebral disk may give rise to symptoms simulating tumor of the cord, syringomyelia or syringobulbia, angina pectoris or sometimes even multiple sclerosis or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but to report a case in which there was involvement of the descending tract of the trigeminal nerve, a condition which to our knowledge has never before been reported.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —J. E. C., a man aged 57, was admitted to the

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