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April 1950

INVOLVEMENT OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IN INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS: Report of a Case with Ataxia and Nystagmus

Author Affiliations

URBANA, ILL.

From the Division of Internal Medicine, Carle Memorial Hospital and Carle Hospital Clinic.

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;63(4):606-610. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310220073007
Abstract

MORE THAN fifty years ago Pfeiffer1 described the first case of infectious mononucleosis and called it "glandular fever." This disease usually affected children and young adults and consisted of fever, inflamed throat, cervical lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, with eventual recovery. In 1923 Downey and McKinlay2 first described the characteristic blood picture and the "atypical lymphocytes" found in infectious mononucleosis. By careful study of blood smears it thus became possible to differentiate the benign infectious mononucleosis from leukemia. In 1932 Paul and Bunnell3 noted that the blood of patients with infectious mononucleosis contained antibodies capable of agglutinating sheep cells. Refinement of this "heterophil antibody test"4 provided a valuable diagnostic procedure for recognition of this disease.

The clinical picture of infectious mononucleosis is now well recognized.5 The patients are usually of a younger age group, and the two sexes are affected equally. The symptoms and signs of

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