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June 1950

SPONTANEOUS THROMBOSIS OF THE CAROTID ARTERIES IN THE NECK: Report of Four Cases

Author Affiliations

DETROIT

From the Department of Surgery, Wayne University College of Medicine; the City of Detroit Receiving and Dearborn Veterans Administration Hospitals, and the Department of Neurosurgery, Grace Hospital.

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;63(6):942-953. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310240101006
Abstract

NEUROLOGIC abnormalities following a "cerebrovascular accident" or "stroke" are generally regarded as manifestations of intracranial vascular disease. It is seldom appreciated that the same picture may be associated with occlusion of the main arterial pathways in the neck.

Interest in this occurrence was recently stimulated by our encountering 3 cases in which the common, external and internal carotid arteries on one side were found to be occluded completely by a thrombus and 1 case with thrombosis of the internal carotid artery (tables 1, 2 and 3). During the initial period of observation the patients were considered to have intracranial cerebrovascular disease. The rarity of this syndrome may be due in part to the fact that clinical and pathologic examination of the large vessels in the neck is usually overlooked. One purpose of this report is to urge routine examination by palpation and by operative exposure, when indicated, of the cervical

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