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September 1950

MYELOMALACIA SECONDARY TO DISSECTING ANEURYSM OF THE AORTA

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Departments of Neurology and Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and the Gastro-Intestinal Section (Kinsey-Thomas Foundation) of the Medical Clinic, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(3):401-416. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310270090005
Abstract

INVOLVEMENT of the nervous system has been reported in numerous cases of dissecting aneurysm of the aorta.1 The neural complications have been produced by an ischemic necrosis. The peripheral nerves, the spinal cord and even the brain have been affected.1b Softening of the spinal cord has occurred when the aneurysmal dissection severed the intercostal or lumbar arteries from the aorta, when a thrombus blocked these vessels directly or otherwise isolated them from the main circulation or when the dissection extended into these branch arteries and choked off their lumens.

Most of the reports on the neurologic occurrences with dissecting aneurysms of the aorta either have been entirely clinical or have been accompanied with an inadequate examination of the nervous system at necropsy. In only 3 cases2 have we been able to find a description of the changes within the spinal cord. Such studies would seem to afford an

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