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September 1950

MANIC PSYCHOSIS IN A CASE OF PARASAGITTAL MENINGIOMA

Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(3):417-430. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310270106006
Abstract

The ADVANCES in the field of pneumoencephalography and electroencephalography have considerably facilitated the diagnosis of tumors of the brain. Nevertheless, every physician, particularly the neurologist and the psychiatrist, knows how easily the diagnosis of a brain tumor may be overlooked. This is particularly so when there are few or no neurologic symptoms or when the symptoms are of a neurotic or psychotic nature. Particularly, the initial symptoms may be those one finds in a neurotic person. Cohen1 described the case of a sailor who was surveyed out of naval service for a variety of neurotic symptoms, particularly anxiety attacks and numerous somatic complaints. Only forty months after the onset of the symptoms the diagnosis of a large astrocytoma was made. The difficulty in making the diagnosis of brain tumor is due largely to the fact that there is no symptomatic picture which may be considered characteristic of a tumor

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