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October 1950

PATTERNS IN ALLESTHESIA AND THEIR RELATION TO DISORDER OF BODY SCHEME AND OTHER SENSORY PHENOMENA

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, New York University-Bellevue Medical Center.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(4):501-515. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310280013002
Abstract

IN RECENT communications one of us (M. B. B.) and associates1 have described unusual sensory changes in patients with diffuse disease of the brain. These changes were unilateral allesthesia, or crossed displacement; extinction of sensation, and disturbances in location and identification of parts of the body. All these dysfunctions were found to be on one side of the body and were associated with severe mental disorder. Analyses of the responses to stimulations made in the affected sensory field disclosed that the defects were more pronounced in one area than in another. Thus, allesthesia, as well as extinction, was found oftenest in an extremity and seldom in the face. Extinction was more likely to occur in the distal than in the proximal portion of an extremity.1c These spatial differences were observed on repeated examinations. Moreover, under the influence of amobarbital sodium (amytal sodium®) the area which yielded allesthesia

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