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November 1950

PRODUCTION OF CONVULSIONS BY ADMINISTRATION OF BENZEDRINE® FOLLOWING BRAIN OPERATIONS IN MONKEYS

Author Affiliations

ORANGE PARK, FLA.

From the Yerkes Laboratories of Primate Biology and Yale University.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(5):685-691. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310290081008
Abstract

CONVINCING evidence has been presented1 that areas of pathological function in the brain may cause more deleterious effects than clear removals of the tissue concerned. In the clinical field, it is becoming accepted that cases of scar, atrophy, abscess, neoplasm, etc., are poorly suited to purposes of localization of function. What is not so well recognized is that experimental ablations are likewise not exempt from surgically produced artefact. Scarring, vascular anomalies and residual necrotic tissue may result in foci of irritation which produce effects remote from the site of injury. Although these foci may not be epileptogenic in themselves, the fact that the introduction of sensitizing agents may cause them to become so2 suggests that they are potential sources of subtler disruptions of cerebral function. Such factors may account for many of the contradictions and discrepancies in the experimental literature.

A possible indication of the existence of irritative

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