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November 1950

IRRITATING EFFECT OF IODIZED VEGETABLE OILS ON THE BRAIN AND SPINAL CORD WHEN DIVIDED INTO SMALL PARTICLES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(5):715-719. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310290111012
Abstract

CERTAIN observations made on the unfavorable reaction to emulsions of iodized vegetable oils in the subarachnoid space of animals appear to be of fundamental importance to the neurologist and the neurosurgeon and are the basis of this report.

Some years ago, in a search for a limpid or an absorbable contrast medium for use in roentgenography of the fluid-bearing spaces of the spine and cranial cavity, it occurred to me that an emulsion of one of the commonly used iodized vegetable oils might serve the purpose, since these oils had been proved, by numerous clinical tests over many years, to be relatively free from irritating properties. Frazier and Glaser1 had apparently already thought along the same line, since in 1928 they suggested the diagnostic use of iodized oil emulsions:

Another thought occurred to us: If an emulsion of the oil [iodized rapeseed oil] can be prepared which will diffuse

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