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December 1950

CAPACITY OF REINNERVATED MUSCLES TO FUNCTION EFFICIENTLY AFTER PROLONGED DENERVATION

Author Affiliations

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

From the Department of Anatomy and Histology, University of Melbourne.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1950;64(6):755-771. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1950.02310300002001
Abstract

THE CHANGES which develop in a muscle which has been deprived of its nerve supply are now well known, though several details relating to the processes involved remain obscure. It is generally recognized, however, that prolonged denervation ultimately leads to a condition which is incompatible with the restoration of useful function, even though the muscle has been satisfactorily reinnervated. Despite its considerable practical importance, there is still no reliable information as to the point at which the changes become irreversible. The object of this paper is to provide data relating to the reinnervation of human muscles after long periods of denervation and their capacity to function effciently offer such reinnervation. An attempt has also been made to ascertain the extent to which the residual defect after delayed nerve repair is attributable to changes in the nerve itself and how much it is due to progressive changes in the denervated muscle.

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