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February 1951

EFFECTS OF DECAMETHONIUM BROMIDE (C10) AND d-TUBOCURARINE ON ELECTROCONVULSIONS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Division of Psychiatry, School of Medicine University of California and the Langley Porter Clinic, Department of Mental Hygiene.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;65(2):174-180. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320020046004
Abstract

THE RELAXING effect of subparalyzing doses of d-tubocurarine chloride is sufficient to render electric convulsion therapy almost without complications. When this drug is used judiciously, there are, again, almost no complications due to individual sensitivity or idiosyncrasy to the drug. However, when the presence of severe cardiovascular, osseous or other organic disease makes it desirable to obtain maximum curarization and modification of the electric fit, d-tubocurarine chloride, in the opinion of many, may fall short of being an ideal drug. Its use in doses sufficiently high to achieve a maximum relaxing effect is at times accompanied with an untoward degree of apprehension and respiratory distress, post-treatment apnea, or bronchospasm from the histamine-like action of the drug. That this apprehension and respiratory discomfort are of importance is indicated by the fact that, aside from the fear of the treatment itself, this distress, once it is experienced, constitutes the patient's

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