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March 1951

STUDIES ON THE IRON CONTENT OF CEREBROSPINAL FLUID IN DIFFERENT PSYCHOTIC CONDITIONS

Author Affiliations

MONTREAL, CANADA

From the Verdun Protestant Hospital.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;65(3):326-336. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320030063007
Abstract

THE METABOLISM of iron and the iron content of the various organs concerned with the formation and destruction of erythrocytes and hemoglobin have been thoroughly investigated in recent years, both in experimental animals and in man.1 The presence and importance of iron as a regular constituent of the cytochrome-oxidase system involved in the respiratory processes of the cell are now well recognized.2 It is therefore not surprising that the iron content of the brain, which has a high oxygen consumption, has become a matter of interest to neuropathologists, biochemists and psychiatrists.

Biondi3 and Guizzetti4 were the first to draw attention to the fact that certain gray masses in the adult brain of man and domestic animals contain a considerable amount of iron, which can be clearly demonstrated in macroscopic brain sections with potassium ferrocyanide or ammonium sulfide. This reaction is absent in the brain of the

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