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April 1951

MIGRAINE AND OTHER HEAD PAIN

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;65(4):477-488. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320040067006
Abstract

THE SYMPTOM of headache is one of the greatest challenges presented to the practitioner in every field of medicine.1 Until the past decade the physician was firmly convinced that the average headache was secondary to a specific disease in the body. With this in mind, extensive investigation of the patient was made to rule out any possible sign of organic disease. Once an abnormality of an organ was determined, a vigorous attempt was made to correct this surgically or medically, with the hope that the headache would disappear as a result of these efforts. The actual symptom of headache was minimized by the patient and the physician, and thus the rounds were made to each specialist for investigation in his sphere of activity. Fortunately for these headache sufferers, a considerable amount of physiologic and clinical data has been accumulated in the attempt to determine the mechanism of production of

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