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August 1951

USE OF METHYLPHENYLSUCCINIMIDE IN TREATMENT OF PETIT MAL EPILEPSY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department Neurology, Division of Child Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Neurological Institute, Presbyterian Hospital.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;66(2):156-162. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320080040003
Abstract

WHILE comparatively excellent drugs are available for the control or reduction of grand mal seizures, the agents which are used in the treatment of intractable petit mal attacks are often inadequate. Although bromides are now little used, heavy reliance still rests on the barbiturates, phenobarbital, and mephobarbital (mebaral®) and in recent years on the new drug trimethadione (tridione®).

Sedation, barbiturate rashes, and slowing of the mental processes are obvious disadvantages of the phenobarbital derivatives, while photophobia, drug rash, and leukopenia handicap the usefulness of trimethadione.

The compound (N-methyl-α-phenylsuccinimide1) which is discussed in this presentation has been found to equal or to surpass trimethadione in therapeutic efficacy and, in addition, is relatively nontoxic.

In laboratory and clinical tests N-methyl-α-phenylsuccinimide has been designated as PM 334 and will hereinafter be so designated for the sake of brevity.

PM 334 was selected for chemical trial from a large number of

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