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September 1951

CENTRAL NERVOUS ACTION OF HYDANTOINS, OXAZOLIDINEDIONES AND THIAZOLIDONES

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;66(3):329-337. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320090078006
Abstract

THAT SEIZURE electroencephalographic patterns may be observed during sleep or by pentylenetetrazole (metrazol®) activation in epileptic patients with normal routine electroencephalograms1 signifies the influence of nervous activity of other regions of the brain on epileptogenic foci in giving rise to clinical attacks.2 It is not surprising, then, to see that an antiepileptic drug is efficacious in certain cases while effective in similar cases only with the addition of a sedative.3 In rare instances, an agent which stimulates the central nervous system has also been found to be of value in combating epileptic convulsions.4 In the discriminate management of epilepsy, therefore, a knowledge of the various actions of an anticonvulsant agent on the central nervous system is required.

In this paper, there will be presented results on the antimetrazol,® antielectroshock, and other actions on the central nervous system of the hydantoins, oxazolidinediones, and thiazolidones. It is hoped

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