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December 1951

BOECK'S SARCOID WITH INVOLVEMENT OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Author Affiliations
NEW YORK
From the Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Neurological Institute, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.
AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1951;66(6):728-737. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1951.02320120061008
Abstract

SINCE Boeck1 first published his original description of sarcoid, in 1899, approximately 1,500 cases have been recorded in the literature. The disease has been reported from many European countries and in increasing numbers from this country, where a high percentage of patients are Negroes.

In general, the disease is a chronic, low-grade, granulomatous process of unknown cause, with fever, malaise, loss of weight, anorexia, and special symptoms or signs referable to involvement of one or more organs of the body. Common manifestations are lesions of the skin, enlargement of lymph nodes, parotitis, visual loss associated with uveitis (the last two being sometimes referred to as uveoparotid fever), and lesions in the lung, often found on routine chest films without symptoms. Elevation of the blood globulin, x-ray changes in the lungs and phalanges, a negative reaction to the tuberculin test, and a positive reaction to the Kveim test are the

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