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March 1952

EFFECTS OF HISTAMINE ON CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS AND METABOLISM

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1952;67(3):354-356. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1952.02320150087010
Abstract

HISTAMINE has been used extensively as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of many neurological disturbances. Its application has been based upon the hope that, since the drug is a potent peripheral vasodilator, benefit might be obtained if its action upon the cerebral vessel were similar to that observed on vessels elsewhere in the body. Animal studies by Forbes and associates1 demonstrated that the intravenous injection of histamine was accompanied by dilatation of the pial arteries unless they were already maximally dilated as the result of ether anesthesia. Weiss and Lennox2 believed they had demonstrated, by a reduction of the cerebral arteriovenous oxygen difference, an increase in the rate of cerebral blood flow during intravenous administration of histamine. With newer techniques now available for examination of cerebral metabolism and hemodynamics, it was considered worth while to reinvestigate the effects on the brain of intravenous administration of histamine. Moreover,

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