[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
April 1953

AN EXTRALEMNISCAL SENSORY SYSTEM IN THE BRAIN

Author Affiliations

LONG BEACH. CALIF.

From the Veterans Administration Hospital, Long Beach, Calif., and the Departments of Surgery and Anatomy, University of California School of Medicine at Los Angeles.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1953;69(4):505-518. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1953.02320280093009
Abstract

IN RECENT years it has become apparent that afferent impulses may reach the cortex by routes distinct from those involving transmission along the classic sensory pathways to the primary receptive areas. In 1936, Derbyshire, Rempel, Forbes, and Lambert1 called attention to impulses evoked by sciatic stimulation which it was possible to record in areas remote from the sensorimotor strip and which had latencies much longer than did potentials confined to this region. These longer-latency potentials were called the "secondary" responses by Forbes and Morison,2 as distinct from the "primary" responses, which had long been well known. Characteristic differences between these two distinct sensory systems aside from projection distribution and latency were elaborated by Dempsey, Morison, and Morison,3 who presented evidence suggesting that the pathway for the "secondary" response might be the medial division of the medial lemniscus and that it might course more centrally before becoming widely

×