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August 1953

GLUTAMINE, GLUTAMIC ACID, AND γ-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID IN CEREBROSPINAL FLUIDS

Author Affiliations

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.

From the Department of Biochemistry, University of Virginia Department of Medicine.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1953;70(2):268-270. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1953.02320320134012
Abstract

THE ROLES of glutamic acid and its derivatives glutamine and γ-aminobutyric acid, which are present in nerve tissue in appreciable quantities, are poorly understood.1 It is possible that the concentrations of these compounds in cerebrospinal fluid may reflect changes in nerve tissue metabolism resulting from neurological disorders. Since available data are scanty,2 it seemed worth while to determine the concentrations of glutamic acid and related compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid in a group of patients with various types of neurological disorders.

METHODS AND MATERIAL  Specimens of cerebrospinal fluid were obtained from patients in the University of Virginia Hospital undergoing pneumoencephalograms for diagnosis. Each specimen was contrifuged for removal of cellular debris and, whenever possible, was analyzed immediately for glutamic acid and glutamine. It was determined that the values obtained were not changed after overnight storage at 5 C.Glutamic acid and glutamine were determined by the procedures recommended

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