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February 1954

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF RECENT STUDIES ON CEREBRAL CIRCULATION OF MAN

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;71(2):148-159. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02320380014002
Abstract

THE NITROUS oxide method, introduced by Kety and Schmidt,1 has made it possible for the first time to measure quantitatively the cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the intact human being. Utilizing such data with the simultaneously measured blood pressure and oxygen contents of arterial and jugular blood, it is possible to calculate the resistance offered to blood passing through the cerebral vessels (CVR) and the oxygen consumption (CMRO2) of the brain. While much of such information thus far is purely of physiological interest, many considerations of clinical importance have emerged.

EFFECTS OF ARTERIOSCLEROSIS AND HYPERTENSION ON THE CEREBRAL CIRCULATION  Arteriosclerosis in the absence of hypertension does not materially reduce the over-all blood flow or oxygen consumption of the brain (Table 1).2 Twenty-three patients, of an average age of 68, were studied. They all exhibited clinical evidence of the presence of systemic arteriosclerosis, such as historical or electrocardiographic

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