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July 1954

CIRCULATORY CONDITIONS IN ELECTROSHOCK THERAPY WITH AND WITHOUT A MUSCLE RELAXANT

Author Affiliations

STOCKHOLM

From Beckomberga Hospital; Head, S. Izikowitz, M.D.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;72(1):73-79. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02330010075005
Abstract

STUDIES on the effects of electroshock therapy on the circulation were made ^ in 1943 by Gordh and Silfverskiöld1 and by Silfverskiöld and Åmark.2 They showed that electroshock therapy produced a considerable rise in the arterial blood pressure and a marked Valsalva effect, with a resulting rise in the venous pressure. Silfverskiöld and Åmark noted a rise in the arterial pressure of 80 to 120 mm. Hg. The venous pressure sometimes rose as high as 100 mm. Hg, or higher.

Altschule and associates3 recorded a mean rise in the venous pressure of 42 mm. Hg in connection with electroshock therapy. Brown and associates * made recordings in dogs, monkeys, and human subjects during electroshocks. They demonstrated an initial fall in the blood pressure and the heart rate; it was followed, after about one second, by a rise above the basic values. In human subjects the systolic pressure rose on

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