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July 1954

APPETITIVEN BEHAVIOR AND SIGN STIMULI IN HUMAN LIFE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Neurological Service of Mount Sinai Hospital, Dr. Morris Bender, Chief Neurologist.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;72(1):92-107. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02330010094008
Abstract

SOME HUMAN behavioral disturbances may be given a biological and uniform type of interpretation; it requires a new usage of some old evolutionary and neurological ideas and the employment of some new biological observations and hypotheses.1

First, behavior is seen as the direct outcome of the evolutionary struggle for existence, as being basically the expression of the factors which made survival of that struggle possible.

Customarily, man's relation to the rest of the animal group is not regarded as a primary, dynamic force underlying his behavior. It is seen as something the human organism tries to get away from; the animal components of man must be repressed and escaped from for man to fit into society. Instincts, when regarded at all as inherited, evolutionary qualities, are considered more as nuisances than as essential parts of man and as the intrinsic foundation of his individual and social behavior. Many types

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