[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.225.194.144. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
September 1954

FAMILIAL OCCURRENCE OF MIGRAINE HEADACHE: A Study of Heredity

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital and the Departments of Medicine (Neurology) and Psychiatry, Cornell University Medical College, and from the Department of Zoology and the Institute for the Study of Human Variation, Columbia University.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;72(3):325-334. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02330030059006
Abstract

THE PATIENT with migraine headache commonly reports that some other member of his family has similar headaches. The migraine syndrome has long been considered familial, and some investigators have presented familial occurrences as evidence of its hereditary character. In 1873, Liveing, in his monograph on "megrim," commented on the frequent occurrence of migraine in the relatives of his "megrim" patients and observed that this disorder was often transmitted from parent to child, especially from a parent to those children who in other respects resembled him.1 Christiansen was of the opinion that migraine is a dominant hereditary factor. This opinion was based on his observation of the very high percentage of his patients with severe migraine who had near relatives with migraine.2 Ulrich studied 500 cases of migraine headache and believed that these patients all inherited a migraine constitution, and that circumstances such as alcohol, infection, fatigue, worry, and

×