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October 1954

BRAIN CHANGES IN PATIENTS WITH EXTENSIVE BODY BURNS

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;72(4):440-451. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02330040042003
Abstract

THERE are approximately 8,000 deaths of burns each year in the United States.1 With the newer concepts of treatment for burns, an increasing number of patients are kept alive who formerly may have succumbed. Although it is not possible to determine the incidence of brain changes in people with body burns, several cases have been reported. There are, however, so few neuropathological studies that, in order to describe the cerebral changes and their possible clinical implications, we are reporting two cases of patients who suffered extensive burns.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  A 14-year-old boy suffered third-degree burns of 40% of his body surface in an airplane accident and lived 16 days. He was treated with plasma, whole blood, antibiotics, corticotropin (ACTH), and intravenous fluids. He became irrational on the seventh day, then anuric, and went into stupor; his temperature rose to 104 F., and he died. His brain

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