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December 1954

FAMILIAL PERIODIC PARALYSIS, MYOTONIA, PROGRESSIVE AMYOTROPHY, AND PES CAVUS IN MEMBERS OF A SINGLE FAMILY

Author Affiliations

PORTLAND, ORE.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine and the Grace-New Haven Community Hospital, New Haven, Conn. Present address: University of Oregon Medical School Hospitals and Clinics; c/o Veterans Administration Hospital, Portland, Ore.

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1954;72(6):726-741. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1954.02330060062009
Abstract

THE ABUNDANT literature concerning "familial periodic paralysis" brings together a remarkable number of clinical phenomena in addition to experimental and laboratory findings that intrigue both clinician and biochemist. Considerable data relating mineral metabolism and a variety of endocrinopathies to diseases of muscle appear to begin to approach solution of the enigmatic problem presented by periodic paralysis and other diseases of muscle.

The present communication has as its purpose the documentation of a family who demonstrate a large number of different myopathic disorders. Furthermore, certain symptoms and signs presented suggest a combined heredity of myopathic and myelopathic or neuropathic disease.

REPORT OF THE O. FAMILY, A KINDRED COMPRISING FIVE GENERATIONS ON WHOM WE HAVE HISTORICAL AND CLINICAL INFORMATION  Seventeen persons in the O. family have been personally examined (numbered cases in fig. 1), and abstracts of clinical histories and neurological and laboratory examinations appear below. Cases 12 and 15, in addition

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