[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 52.200.130.163. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other
February 1955

SECRETION OF ANTIDIURETIC HORMONE IN RESPONSE TO NOXIOUS STIMULI

AMA Arch NeurPsych. 1955;73(2):135-137. doi:10.1001/archneurpsyc.1955.02330080013005
Abstract

THE CLASSIC studies of Verney and his associates reveal that exposure to physical or emotional stimuli which are noxious to animal or man results in an inhibition of the diuresis induced by the ingestion of water. A marked diminution in the rate of urine production occurs in animals exposed to such varied stimuli as severe exercise, surgical trauma, mechanical shaking, flashing lights, histamine, and so forth. In fact, the same stimuli which can initiate the sequence of events described by Selye as the "alarm reaction" elicit also an antidiuretic response. Extracts from the hypothalamus of such stressed animals exhibit a marked diminution in the concentration of antidiuretic hormone.

Direct evidence that an increase in the antidiuretic activity of the blood occurs when an animal is exposed to a noxious stimulus was not available until recently. With the development of a relatively simple, sensitive, and precise procedure for the assay of

×