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May 2, 1908

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE SPINAL CORD, THE SYMPATHETIC SYSTEM, AND THERAPEUTIC MEASURES.

JAMA. 1908;L(18):1401-1405. doi:10.1001/jama.1908.25310440011002b
Abstract

In 1834 there was published a book by William and Daniel Griffin, brothers—one a physician of Edinburgh, the other a surgeon of London—in which they say: "We should like to learn why pressure on a particular vertebra increases, or excites, the disease about which we are consulted, why it at one time excites headache, or croup, or sickness of the stomach;" and so on; and again, "Why in some instances any of these complaints may be called up at will by touching a corresponding point of the spinal chain?" "Why that point should always be sore to the touch in such attack, . . . " and so on.

These observers analyzed 148 cases of various disorders and grouped them according to regions of spinal tenderness, and the complaints arranged themselves in groups as the following table† shows:

These early writers thought that a goodly number of disorders originated in irritation in the region

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