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Article
June 3, 1911

THE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF A CASE OF ILLUMINATING GAS POISONING

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI

JAMA. 1911;LVI(22):1651-1653. doi:10.1001/jama.1911.02560220027013
Abstract

In looking through the literature and statistics on illuminating gas poisoning one is struck by the meagerness of the reports and by the variety of nomenclature used in describing cases. One finds, for instance, descriptions under the titles "Asphyxia," "Coal Gas Poisoning," "Carbon Monoxid Poisoning," "Poisoning by Noxious or Irrespirable Gases." In the several instances the cases have been the result of blowing out of gas lights, either because of ignorance or with suicidal intent; carelessness in heaping clothes on gas fixtures in such a way as to turn the cocks; leaking of gas fixtures; badly constructed or worn-out stoves and fixtures; or, as in my case, the overturning of a gas heater by an individual alcoholically stimulated to the point of carelessness.

During years 1900-1910, there were ten cases of illuminating gas poisoning at the City Hospital with six deaths.

Illuminating gas contains:

The carbon monoxid in this mixture

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