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October 2, 1897

THE SURGEON OF OLD IN WAR.

JAMA. 1897;XXIX(14):665-667. doi:10.1001/jama.1897.02440400001001

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Abstract

Military surgeons in the Roman army.  —The most careful investigations have failed to make out from their writings whether the Romans regularly appointed physicians and surgeons to their armies or not, although nearly every other question relating to their military organization has been treated of, sometimes very fully. What little information we possess on the subject comes mainly from mortuary or from votive tablets. Borcovicus, in Northumberland, now called Housesteads—was one of the principal stations on the line of Hadrian's wall. Here about seventy years ago, was found a monumental tablet, now in the Newcastle Museum. On it is the following inscription:The First Tungrian Cohort is known to have been present at the battle of the Mons Grampius, and to have served at Castlecary, at Cramond near Edinburgh, in Cumberland and at Housesteads. The tablet is highly ornamented, and antiquarians hold that a rabbit and round bucklers carved in

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