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Article
December 7, 1895

IMPURE MILK IN RELATION TO INFANTILE MORTALITY.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF HYGIENE, MEDICAL DEPARTMENT GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY, WASHINGTON, D.C.

JAMA. 1895;XXV(23):983-987. doi:10.1001/jama.1895.02430490011001e

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Abstract

Last winter I had the pleasure of assisting our respected President in the collection of evidence on milk infections; the task proved so profitable that, by his encouragement, the investigation was extended in other directions and I present to you the results in one of these fields.

According to Oesterlein's statistics, it is safe to assert that the average death rate during the first year of life is 188 out of 1000 infants born. In England the average is 141.8; in France 223.2; in Italy 273.3. (Farr). These are mean rates for rural and urban districts. In towns and cities the mortality is always higher, amounting to 33.6 per cent., as compared with a rural mortality of 27.8 per cent. In some of the large cities the infantile mortality is simply frightful, having reached as high as:

The still-births are excluded in the American statistics. From these figures it appears,

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