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Article
January 10, 1925

ARTHRITIS OF THE MENOPAUSE: A STUDY OF FIFTY CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Cornell Pay Clinic and the Second (Cornell) Medical Division of Bellevue Hospital.

JAMA. 1925;84(2):75-79. doi:10.1001/jama.1925.02660280001001
Abstract

At the present time, chronic arthritis is usually classified with respect to its pathologic rather than its clinical manifestations. Pathologically, the disease may be divided into three groups: the hypertrophic, atrophic and periarticular forms. This classification has been widely accepted as a convenient way of differentiating the various types of lesions which chronic arthritis may display.

Comparatively little effort has been made to classify chronic arthritis into clinical groups. Within the last decade, the importance of focal infection in the etiology of chronic arthritis has been emphasized by McCrea,1 Billings,2 Rosenow 3 and others. Indeed, many of the modern writers on arthritis are disposed to look on all chronic inflammatory conditions of the joints as infectious. In any case, infectious arthritis has not been sharply differentiated clinically from other types of chronic arthritis.

During the last three years, 350 cases of arthritis have been admitted to the Cornell

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