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Article
October 17, 1931

STREPTOCOCCAL AGGLUTININS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Second (Cornell) Medical Division and the Pathological Laboratories of Bellevue Hospital, the Cornell Clinic, and the Department of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College.

JAMA. 1931;97(16):1146-1147. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730160028007
Abstract

In reviewing the literature dealing with the bacteriology of rheumatoid arthritis,1 one is impressed by the diversity of the results obtained. While the relation of focal infection to rheumatoid arthritis is generally recognized, there is doubt in the minds of many as to whether the joint manifestations are actually metastatic infections or whether they are merely an expression of some toxic or allergic influence. In respect to the bacteriologic agent responsible for the disease, the majority of investigators look on the streptococcus as the exciting cause, but there is considerable disagreement as to which type is responsible. Some workers consider rheumatoid arthritis a Streptococcus hemolyticus infection while others look on the indifferent or green producing streptococcus as the causative agent. Still other investigators believe that the staphylococcus, the diphtheroid bacillus or other micro-organisms as well as the streptococcus can produce deforming arthritis. Although a number of workers have found

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