[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 24, 1931

THE DIFFERENTIATION OF PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL SPASM AND OCCLUSION IN AMBULATORY PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

From the Department of Surgery, the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry.

JAMA. 1931;97(17):1212-1215. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730170024008
Abstract

Careful clinical examination yields most of the information needed in the study of vascular diseases of the extremities. The appearance of the limb in the horizontal, the elevated and the dependent positions, the return of color after temporary local compression and after elevation (including the angle of circulatory sufficiency), the comparative warmth of the parts, and palpation for arterial pulsations suffice to demonstrate circulatory impairment and to indicate roughly its degree. These accepted methods of physical examination fail, however, to show the cause of this deficiency: whether it is dependent on a mechanical plugging of the vessels or on vascular spasm. It has long been common knowledge that certain rare vascular disturbances are dependent on an arterial spasm. The spastic element in these interesting but infrequent syndromes, such as true Raynaud's disease, can usually be suspected from the history of paroxysmal seizures related to cold and separated by intervals of

×