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Article
November 7, 1931

THE MAGNITUDE OF REGURGITATION WITH AORTIC LEAKS OF DIFFERENT SIZES: A REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL WORK

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Physiology Laboratory, Western Reserve University.

JAMA. 1931;97(19):1359-1364. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730190015004
Abstract

[Editorial Note.  —This paper, together with the papers of Drs. Katz and Sutton, concludes the symposium on the heart and the circulation. The papers of Drs. Henderson, Eyster and Bazett were published last week.]Since Corrigan in 1832 first described the typical pulse of aortic insufficiency and attributed its rapid collapse to diastolic backflow, clinical and laboratory investigators alike have attempted to evaluate the magnitude of the regurgitation in this condition. I have long maintained that crucial evidence of a considerable regurgitation has not been adduced and further that all the typical signs can be logically explained on the assumption that only a reasonably small regurgitation takes place. By this I mean a regurgitation volume equivalent to about 5 or 10 per cent of the systolic ejection, in contrast to the 50 or 60 per cent generally assumed by those who speak of a large, a considerable, a substantial or

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