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Article
November 21, 1931

PRIMARY ABDOMINAL PREGNANCY: A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE, WITH REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

HOUSTON, TEXAS

JAMA. 1931;97(21):1521-1523. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730210019006
Abstract

The rarity of primary abdominal pregnancy is too well recognized to require any especial emphasis. Although case reports have appeared in the literature sporadically, a critical survey reveals the fact that the majority of the cases are not primary implantation of the ovum on the peritoneum but are secondary to tubal abortion or ruptured tubal pregnancy. Statistics of Hecker1 recorded the primary twice as frequently as the secondary type, but, according to Williams,2 careful study of the specimens showed that most of them were secondary to ruptured tubal pregnancy. As a matter of fact, some writers, notably Bland Sutton,1 have denied the existence of such a condition. Gould and Pyle3 failed to mention this condition in their "Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine." In a review of 156,000 cases of pregnancy at the New York Lying-In Hospital, Harrar4 found 10 cases of apparent primary abdominal pregnancy,

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