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Article
December 5, 1931

THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE BRAIN INJURIES: WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE INDICATIONS FOR OPERATION

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.

From the Department of Neurological Surgery, Medical College of Virginia.

JAMA. 1931;97(23):1696-1700. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730230038009
Abstract

The rapidly increasing number of brain injuries constitutes a problem of great interest to nearly all departments of clinical medicine. If one may judge from the vast literature on the subject, there still remains a wide difference of opinion as to the management of these cases. It has been customary in recent articles on the subject of head injuries to begin the discussion by stressing the importance of the brain injury rather than that of the associated fracture of the skull. It is obvious that injury to the brain is the important lesion in such cases, and the studies of the patient should be made with this idea in view. Fracture of the skull, however, should not be ignored, and the location and type of fracture often give definite indications of the site of the important intracranial lesion. The admitted necessity of operating on compound or depressed fracture of the

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