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Article
December 19, 1931

THE HYPOPHYSEAL-OVARIAN RELATIONSHIP: QUANTITATIVE STUDIES WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO HYPERPLASIA OF THE ENDOMETRIUM

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Department of Anatomy, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1931;97(25):1859-1861. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730250017006
Abstract

Endometrial hyperplasia has long been one of the major problems of gynecology. Its exact etiology has been unknown, but its relationship to a disordered ovarian function has been recognized.

The material presented in this paper is taken from studies carried out on the etiology of endometrial hyperplasia1 and on the functional relationship between the hypophysis and the ovary.2 These studies suggest that certain disorders of the hypophyseal-ovarian relationship may have considerable importance in our understanding of endometrial hyperplasia.

In applying the results of animal experiments to the interpretation of conditions in human beings, much confusion has arisen on account of differences in terminology as applied to the estrual and the menstrual cycles.

Allen3 has accurately described the estrual cycle of the mouse. The unmated mouse has a period of estrus every four to five days. This period is characterized by cornification of the vaginal epithelium. Ovulation takes

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