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Article
January 9, 1932

ABSENCE OF THE CERVICAL SPINE: KLIPPEL-FEIL SYNDROME

JAMA. 1932;98(2):129-132. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730280037009
Abstract

Anomalies in the cervical spine are uncommon; especially rare are those described under the obscure term of the Klippel-Feil syndrome. This consists in a numerical variation in the cervical vertebrae with more or less complete fusion into one mass, accompanied in some cases with spina bifida or other anomalies. Although the condition had been described before, it was first presented in detail by Klippel and Feil1 in 1912 and on this account has been referred to as the Klippel-Feil syndrome.

About thirty such cases have been reported, mostly in the French literature. Three cases have been reported in America and one in England. The French refer to it as "les hommes sans cou," the Germans as "kurzhalz." In this report six cases, one male and five female, will be presented. It occurs in males and females about equally. In an examination of 2,000 skeletons in the Department of Anatomy

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