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Article
January 16, 1932

MACROCYTOSIS OF THE ERYTHROCYTES AND ACHLORHYDRIA IN PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Cleveland Clinic.

JAMA. 1932;98(3):202-207. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730290018005
Abstract

MACROCYTOSIS OF THE ERYTHROCYTES IN PERNICIOUS ANEMIA  Hayem,1 an early student of the morphology of the blood, found very large erythrocytes in a case of severe anemia. His patient, probably suffering from pernicious anemia, had 414,062 red cells per cubic millimeter of blood with a hemoglobin value of 554,840 normal cells and a color index of 1.34. Eichhorst,2 who wrote the first monograph on pernicious anemia, thought curiously enough, that microcytosis was the most characteristic finding in this disease, and Quincke,3 another early student, considered poikilocytosis a characteristic feature. In 1876, Sørensen4 described the blood conditions in pernicious anemia and made the following statement:On the contrary, I find the considerable size of the blood corpuscles fairly characteristic for I have not observed such in other morbid conditions and this forms a contrast to what occurs in chlorosis where, as mentioned, I often met with blood

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