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Article
January 23, 1932

SKULL AND BRAIN TRAUMAS: THEIR SEQUELAE: A CLINICAL REVIEW OF TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY-FIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

JAMA. 1932;98(4):271-276. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730300001001
Abstract

It is well known that, after recovery has occurred from the acute effects of a head injury, numerous vestiges of the injury often remain or develop in the form of subacute or chronic symptoms and signs. In an attempt to establish a basis for more accurate determination as to the prognosis of these later sequelae, we have investigated 255 cases, which have been followed from one to five years after accident. In this study we were primarily concerned with the relationship existing between the location of the fracture and the development and duration of both symptoms and neurologic signs, as well as with the significance of the primary period of unconsciousness.

The series was subdivided into groups depending on the presence and location of fracture, the diagnosis of which was determined by roentgenography. Rupture of the ear membrane, with resulting hemorrhage, or a distended bluish membrane was considered diagnostic of

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