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Article
January 30, 1932

FEDERALIZATION OF HEALTH AND HYGIENE THROUGH SHEPPARD-TOWNERISM

JAMA. 1932;98(5):404-405. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730310044013
Abstract

The Sheppard-Towner Maternity and Infancy Act became a law, Nov. 23, 1921. The act, so adroitly framed as almost wholly to preclude the possibility of a review by the United States Supreme Court, authorized the Children's Bureau in the Department of Labor to enter into agreements or compacts with such states as were willing to surrender to the federal government for monetary considerations their rights to supervise and control maternal and child hygiene. As the people of every state had to contribute their shares of the general fund through federal taxation and as they could get none of their money back unless their state governments submitted to federal domination, the scheme succeeded. That is, it provided for setting up an elaborate federal machine and for keeping it in operation. On June 30, 1929, however, the act died. Congress had killed it by express repeal.

During the seven and one-half years

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