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Article
June 23, 1956

CURRENT TRENDS IN THE FEEDING OF INFANTS AND CHILDREN

JAMA. 1956;161(8):728-729. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.62970080008017
Abstract

In few other fields of medicine has knowledge of nutrition been applied with such obvious success as in the care of infants and children. The prevention of scurvy and rickets and of the diarrheal diseases of infants has been so complete that their absence among pediatric patients is now largely taken for granted. From beginnings in clinical and laboratory investigation, through active medical and public health crusading, we have adopted dietary practices and standards of food preservation under which these diseases are most unlikely to occur. Deficiency diseases may now be more likely to appear because the established dietary habits of local groups are temporarily disturbed than because any large section of the populace is subsisting at a marginal level. A recent article in The Journal describes an increasing incidence of scurvy in a southern region where the old custom of giving "pot liquor" (a good source of vitamin C)

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