[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 14, 1932

ACUTE APLASTIC ANEMIA COMPLICATING ARSPHENAMINE THERAPY: REPORT OF A CASE TREATED FOR SYPHILIS COINCIDENT WITH TUBERCULOSIS

Author Affiliations

DENVER

From the National Jewish Hospital at Denver and the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1932;98(20):1725-1728. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730460029011
Abstract

The first to give a clinical description of aplastic anemia was Ehrlich,1 in 1888, whose patient developed this disease condition following a severe uterine hemorrhage. Many case reports followed with speculative discussions as to whether this form of anemia is a distinct disease entity or a symptom-complex of purpura hemorrhagica. Duke2 emphasizes that the course and symptoms of this disease depend in the main on which of the three principal blood-forming elements of the bone marrow is mostly affected. The usual symptoms of progressive anemia will predominate when the erythropoietic tissue is chiefly affected; agranulocytosis with subsequent infection, notably angina, when there is failure of regeneration of leukocytes, and purpura with hemorrhage when there occurs a considerable diminution in the blood platelets. This valuable conception is important to bear in mind, since it helps to give a proper appraisal of some of the blood dyscrasias which occasionally follow

×