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Article
July 30, 1932

FOCAL ENLARGEMENT OF THE TEMPORAL BONE AS A SIGN OF BRAIN TUMOR

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Neurological Department of the University of Pennsylvania.

JAMA. 1932;99(5):379-381. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740570025007
Abstract

Bony thickening or hyperostosis overlying tumors of meningeal origin in some parts of the skull has within recent years gained a secure foothold in cerebral pathology. Spiller,1 Cushing,2 Penfield,3 Winkleman4 and others have contributed to our knowledge of its occurrence and characteristics. It is a slowly growing, hard prominence of uncertain nature, believed by some to be secondary to invasion of the skull by the intracranial tumor accompanied by bone formation. Spiller5 stated that he was of the opinion that hyperostosis of the cranium immediately above a fibroblastoma may not invariably be produced by infiltration of tumor cells.

My object in this paper is to record and discuss two instances of external prominence of the squamous portion of the temporal bone in children, directly overlying an intracranial tumor and not due to hyperostosis but to bulging. In each, the occurrence was sufficiently early to furnish

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