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Article
July 20, 1935

CHEMICAL NATURE OF HEMATOPOIETIC SUBSTANCES PRESENT IN LIVER

JAMA. 1935;105(3):204-205. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760290038015
Abstract

The observation about nine years ago that liver contained a substance which when fed to patients with pernicious anemia produced a dramatic improvement aroused immediate interest regarding the chemical nature of the active substance. Chemical "dissections" of the complex hepatic material were undertaken in several laboratories and within a relatively short time information that gave considerable insight into the chemistry of the hematopoietic substance was reported.1 The active agent did not appear to be a carbohydrate, lipid, protein, proteose, peptone, simple polypeptide, purine, pyrimidine or single amino acid. Apparently it was a nitrogenous base, perhaps a secondary or tertiary amine. Further evidence of the nitrogenous character of the substance was reported by another group of investigators;2 their results, however, suggested that the active agent was probably a simple polypeptide.

In the five years since the completion of these pioneer investigations, progress in studies of the chemistry of the

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