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Article
June 12, 1943

RED CELL TRANSFUSIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF ANEMIA: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Medical School, and from the Passavant Memorial Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;122(7):417-419. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840240007003
Abstract

The extensive use of human plasma in recent years has made available large quantities of red blood cells. These for the most part have been discarded. Interest in the use of red cells for transfusion purposes has arisen in England during the last few years. MacQuaide and Mollison,1 Williams and Davie2 and Watson3 all have used concentrated erythrocyte suspensions successfully for the treatment of anemia. In this country Warren Cooksey4 has given numerous transfusions of red cells suspended in saline solution. He has been responsible for the increasing interest and use of such transfusions by physicians in the Detroit area.

Red cells were used for transfusion purposes by Robertson5 during the first world war and by Castellanos and Riera6 in 1937.

In 1938 I gave a transfusion of washed red cells to a patient with subacute leukemia who suffered reactions from whole blood. The

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